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Nathaniel Turner & Margaret
Husband:
Nathaniel Turner
Born:
1600 in , , , England
Married:
1626 in , , , England
Died:
Jan 1645/46 in Sea
Wife:
Margaret
Born:
about 1602 in , , , England
Died:
Unknown
Children:
01  (F):
Mary Turner
Died:
15 Oct 1704
02  (F):
Rebecca Turner
Born:
about 1631
Died:
Unknown
Spouse:
Thomas Meekes
03  (F):
Abigail Turner
Born:
about 1631
Died:
1693
04  (M):
Nathaniel Turner
Born:
about 1633
Died:
13 Jan 1661/62
05  (F):
Hannah Turner
Born:
17 Nov 1639
Died:
Unknown
06  (M):
Isaac Turner
Born:
07 Jun 1640
Died:
27 Mar 1699
More Info:

Nathaniel Turner:

Notes:

Nathaniel and Margaret arrived in Massachusetts with the Winthrop fleet in 1630. They settled in Lynn, MA where they lived in Nahant street, and owned "the whole of Sagamore Hill." Nathaniel became a freeman on July 3, 1632. He was a constable in 1632, a representative in 1634, and a deputy in 1635. Having been a soldier in England, he became an original member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston. He also served in the Pequot War in 1636-1637.
The family moved to New Haven, CT in about1637 after their home in Lynn was destroyed by fire. They were among the first settlers (Nathaniel was an original signer of the New Haven Agreement) and they became members of the New Haven First Congregational Church. Nathaniel was assistant to the Governor in 1639 and deputy in the Connecticut Assembly. He helped explore the land in Connecticut as far west as the Hudson River, where he made contact with the Dutch of New Amsterdam. On Sep. 1, 1640 Nathaniel was appointed Captain of all martial affairs of the New Haven Colony.
Some of the richer men of New Haven decided to build a ship to promote trade with the other colonies and England. Though ill-built and very "walt-side," finally the ship was completed. In January 1646, with Nathaniel onboard, the vessel ploughed its way through three miles of ice in New Haven harbor and tackled the stormy Atlantic, entrusted with a cargo of wheat, peas, hides, beaver and peltry. The ship was never heard of again.

ref: The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vols. I-III, by Robert Charles Anderson (Boston, 1995).




Revised: 11/9/2011