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note.gif "Reverie"
N.O.K.
Page Five
Bay Ridge
Brooklyn
New York, N.Y.

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main_entrance_lintel_ps_94.jpg
Lintel above main entrance to Public School 94. That's authentic stone, not styrofoam, or cement over pressed board. PS 94 is not a High School, but a grammar school - kindergarten to 6B. Photo by Gene Sirota - 7/99.
 

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main_entrance_ps_94.jpg
Sad to see such a grand entrance fitted with "prison" doors. In my time - during WW2, this main entrance was graced with ornate windowed doors from top to bottom. Attaching cheap metal signs to the architecture would have been unheard of. As a student, unless delinquent in some manner, and escorted by a parent, you never passed through these doors. I can not remember ever using this entrance...thank goodness.



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The play ground behind PS-94. In my day, it extended across to the next street. This must be an addition attached many years ago, but after my tenure. We mustered here every morning before entering the building, in line, and in order, using the "back" doors. Photo by Gene Sirota 7/99.

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PS - 94 Looks the same today, as back during "the war". A substantial structure, as was most buildings back then. Part of the New York Board of Education Public School System, I remember it fondly.
School was from eight 'til three. One teacher for each term - six years from kindergarten to graduation - 6B. Though I remember seeing the Principal a few times in those years, I remember his name to be Epstein...a personage as awesome to us kids as the President of the U.S.
I remember the school lunch to be a wholesome soup, and a sandwich... usually jelly. Half-way through the morning we had a container of milk. It wasn't free as I remember the term "milk money", and "lunch money"...I think it was a dime. I remember all the class rooms had a picture of George Washington, and an American flag. Each morning at the start of class the teacher read a passage from the King James bible. One thing I'll never forget is when we switched from red ties to blue ties right after WW2...when the "cold war" began. That was only once a week on "assembly" days...white shirt with blue tie. Other than that, there was no uniform dress. The whole school smelled of Crayola Crayons, paste, and yellow drawing paper...rough stuph called "Oaktag". Innocence pervailed throughout...the word sex meant nothing...we were just children being children.

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Photography by Gene Sirota.

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