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note.gif "Norwegian"

1) Start of Socony Ships



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The emblem above is drawn from memory. As with most things nautical, including the seamen who sailed the ships, no mention is made of it anywheres. I can well remember painting around this ornate enameled-steel sign as I painted the stack, seated in a bos'n chair thirty, or forty-feet above the "hurricane", or "stack" deck. In those days you hoisted yourself up, and lowered yourself down...no safety belts, or line tenders, or any non-sense of the kind.



1) S S Siwanoy
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The Siwanoy. Sister ship to my first ever - the
S S Shabonee; and subsequent ships - Saucon, Satucket, and Siwanoy; all T-3 Tankers.

We ate well on these ships. Here's a Menu from the Siwanoy. Thanks to Charlie.

A great find! Charley, who uses photos as bookmarks, came across one of the Mobilight taken in Beaumont, Texas...so Charley thinks. Accompanying that is one of Charley at the Astern Throttle in the Engine Room of the Siwanoy. Charley says:

HI CARL,
I SIT HERE AT TIMES AND GO THRU THE WHOLE PROCESS OF ANSWERING THE TELEGRAPH, LOGGING THE "BELL" WHAT TO DO AS FAR AS WHAT VALVES TO TWEEK , WHAT PUMPS TO SPEED OR SLOW DOWN, THE WHOLE WORKS, MATTER OF FACT I THINK I COULD GO RIGHT ON BOARD ANY TIME AND TAKE OVER. I CAN SEE THE WHOLE ENGINE AND BOILER ROOMS AS IF IT WERE YESTERDAY. NO PROBLEM ON THE PHOTOS, I'M STILL FINDING MOMENTOS OF THOSE DAYS IF EVEN IN OLD POST CARD S THAT I SENT HOME.


Thanks Charley


2) M V Providence Socony
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The Motor Barge Providence Socony. My first job on deck. Part of the inland fleet, she carried 15,000 BBLS, was twin screw - Atlas Diesels.
Click Here for more photos, and text.


3) M V Poughkeepsie Socony
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The Poughkeepsie Socony. Similar to the Providence Socony, but newer, and sister to the Plattsburgh Socony. Shown here approaching.
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The Poughkeepsie Socony...stern view.
Click Here for more photos, and text.


4) M V Chicago Socony
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The Chicago Socony. The then new breed of motor barge...first class accomodations as compared to the older motor barges. The wheel house could be raised, and lowered hydraulically for passing under low bridges.


5) M V Traverse City Socony
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The Traverse City Socony. Servicing the Great Lakes, she looked like a mini_deep sea ship, except when loaded...see her anchors in the water. Tall masts, and huge stack for her size - 25,000 BBL, she looked good. Sailed her only on Lake Michigan between Green Bay, Wisconsin, Muskegan, Illinois, Milwaukee, and East Chicago, Indiana.
Click Here for more photos, and text.


6) S S Mobil Gas
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The Mobil Gas. Strictly of Mobil Corporation design, these tankers were famous the world over. Tall stately masts, and funnels, these ships earned their reputation as reliable, and good. Sister to the "Fuel", "Oil", and Socony Vacuum. Replaced by newer ships, adopting the same names in the "fifties".
Click Here for more photos, and text.


7) S S Perryville
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The S S Perryville, a T-2 class tanker on Bare Boat Charter from Keystone Corporation. Other Mobil chartered T-2s were the Gaines Mill, and Mill Spring. Turbo-Electric, these ships were quite manueverable, especially for backing. Capacity around 144,000 BBLs, similar to the T-3s, today they are considered small. Contrary to thought, tankers are the cleanest of ships.


8) S S Eclipse
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The S S Eclipse, a Mobil Designed vessel unique in that the following new ships replacing the older ones didn't follow the Eclipse design. She was the first of the "Baby Super Tankers" for the American Flagged Mobil ships.
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The S S Eclipse, another view.


9) S S Mobil Gas
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The S S Mobil Gas, replacement for the old of the same name. Nice design by Mobil, establishing a class for "Fuel", "Oil", "Light", etc. Of course, today these ships are considered small, even at 210,000 BBLs. Valves were still manual, but the new constant-tension mooring winches were a welcome feature, though the inland fleet had these for years.


10) S S Socony Vacuum
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The S S Socony Vacuum, replacement for the old of the same name.


11) S S Mobiloil
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The S S Mobiloil, replacement for the old of the same name...the third "Oil" for the company.
This image shows vessel in new house colors - Light Blue versus the popular Socony Red.
My last ship with the company. Discharged as 2nd Mate...took a year off, then joined MSTS.


Headquarters


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When I joined Socony in '51, their main office was at 26 Broadway in Lower Manhattan in their building pictured to the left above.
In the mid-fifties, they built a new building, shown on the right above, at 150 E-42nd Street in Mid Manhattan.
Around that time they also changed their company name to Socony Mobil...later to just plain Mobil.
During the period when the older building was headquarters, Socony also had a "shipping office" at Five State Street...just a short walk from the main building. There the seaman were assigned to ships...a pleasant, large room looking out towards the Battery. When the new building was operational, the State Street place was discontinued.
As a young officer I worked temporarily in both buildings, sometimes for months, in their Personnel Section. It was called "Training And Evaluation". It was alright in the sense that I stayed at my regular wage as an officer, and accrued vacation time commensurate with the seagoing plan...In other words, three-months in the office got me one-month payed leave...not bad...what!
However, office time didn't count towards my license...a real bummer, that.


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